Phone Coaching Can Help Promote Modest Weight Loss

Many Americans rarely leave home without their phones, and that could come in handy for those attempting to lose weight, according to a new study.

“Since so many people use cell phones and gas prices were getting higher, we thought, ‘How well can we reach people, and how well can we reach people if it’s not face to face?'” said Larry Tucker, Ph.D., the study’s lead author.

Tucker and colleagues at Brigham Young University found that of 120 men and women who received 11 sessions of personalized weight-loss phone coaching over a 17-week period lost an average of seven pounds, compared with an average of four pounds in un-coached adults. The sessions lasted 30 minutes.

The study appears in the November/December issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

“People tend to do better when they have a support system and when they have someone they report to each week. The weight loss coach can help people work through weight loss issues, barriers and problems,” Tucker said. “Compared to no coaching, phone coaching tends to show a benefit.”

Adding daily weight-loss supplements designed to decrease appetite and increase metabolism also produced weight loss, the authors found. Daily supplement users lost about 6.8 pounds, compared with only about four pounds in placebo users.

The greatest total weight and body fat loss — about 9.7 pounds overall and 5 pounds of fat — occurred in adults who received both coaching and took the daily supplement.

The authors disclosed that TriVita, Inc., the company that manufactures the weight-loss supplement, provided funding to the study through a research grant.

“Over time, a person is going to have to learn a new lifestyle, but I think this particular supplement may be of value to help a person while they’re transitioning into that new lifestyle,” Tucker said.

However, the study may leave readers with more questions than answers, said Robert Jeffery, Ph.D., director of the Obesity Prevention Center at the University of Minnesota.

“You couldn’t tell by reading the study what the coaches were talking about. They talked to participants 11 times, but it doesn’t say what they told people to do,” Jeffery said.

And although this study found that participants dropped pounds, it may not compare to traditional weight-loss programs.

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Return to Fat Camp Weight Loss Back in MTV

Being fat stinks for everyone, especially teens. New TV program called Return to FAT Camp deals with teen weight loss issues.

For overweight teenagers trying to “fit in” can seem almost impossible – from getting teased at school to participating in sports, many of these kids find it hard just to feel ‘normal’.

They dream of losing weight, looking good and becoming popular and at “Fat Camp” that’s exactly what happens even if they don’t lose a pound!

Through first person encounters, MTV’s News and Docs presents “Return to Fat Camp” on Saturday, December 1st @ 12pm ET/PT and explores the lives of five young people who are battling their weight while having the time of their lives and finally fitting in at a weight loss camp where to them becomes a safe environment.

Viewers of Return to Fat Camp can follow the campers’ progress by checking out before and after photos on MTV.com.

The Think Community at think.mtv.com will help viewers cope with issues featured in this episode by providing resources on obesity and healthy self image. Viewers will also be able to comment on the show and the issues on think.mtv.com.

In “Return to Fat Camp,” MTV spends another summer at Camp Pocono Trails with no-nonsense Camp Director Tony Sparber.

Five new campers are hoping to change their lives by shedding pounds, making friends and building self confidence before returning to another challenging year of school.

“Return to Fat Camp” viewers will meet Logan, a 14 year old from North Carolina, who is burdened with the knowledge that her family is sacrificing financially to send her to fat camp; Adisa, a 14 year old returning to camp for a second summer with a goal of losing thirty pounds; Dan, a 15 year old who has never been away from his family before; Sam, an attractive averaged size girl who sees herself as overweight and Justin, a 400 pound teenager who knows his weight is more than an image problem and knows he has to do something about it before it’s too late.

In this documentary, viewers will see that while at camp the kids discover a world that is completely new to them – most are finally able to feel comfortable in their own skin, no matter what size they are. Shy, introverted teens that have never had friends are suddenly the life of the party.

In a place where everyone is overweight, these teens feel accepted and confident. But surprisingly, fat camp can also be a place where the hunted become hunters…Here overweight, ostracized teens turn the tables by picking on their plus-sized peers.

Think.MTV.com is a dynamic, multimedia-driven Community and enables youth to easily learn more about the issues that matter to them most, share their opinions – via uploaded online videos, podcasts and blogs – and connect with others to make a difference.

The fat camp site is one of the only to reward members for positive actions taken online or off, serving up chances to hang out with socially conscious celebs, access to exclusive MTV events, exposure on MTV and other national media outlets, as well as grants, scholarships and more.

Is Summer Time For Weight Loss or Gain?

Which version of summer time for overweight kids do you believe happens most of the time?

Some may say summer is time weight loss because of more daylight and warmer weather. The children may be more active, happier, less stressed and there is greater availability of the best tasting fruits and vegetables. On the other hand, some people may say summer is time for weight gaining because of less structure; greater availability of snacks; more time to spend on computers, playing video games, watch movies and other sedentary behaviors.

Dr. Paul Von Hippel and his colleagues from Ohio State University and Indiana University studied 5380 children from 310 schools to find out which version of summertime happens more often. They found that the Weight Gaining scenario happened so often that the average child that they studied gained significantly more weight during the summer than during the school year. This was true for all children, but especially so for overweight children. (American Journal of Public Health, 2007; 97:696-702)

These findings certainly apply to adults, as well. You may have noticed this in your own life. Vacations often involve more activity than your everyday life. Your walking around, exploring new cities, and perhaps doing such things as shopping or playing golf or tennis. Unfortunately, these weight losing aspects of vacations get trumped by eating out more in restaurants and adopting the “vacation mentality.” You probably know that kind of vacation thinking. It often goes something like this,” Well, this is my time to relax – and enjoy myself. I don’t want to focus on what I’m eating, just enjoy food and take it easy.”

Another aspects of vacations and summer time more generally concerns traveling. Traveling creates it’s own challenges for weight controllers. You have the inevitable frustrations with airlines and inbred hassle factors like getting lost, feeling disappointed in certain aspects of the trip, sleeping less soundly, and generally getting tired more than ideal. All of these factors can lead to mindless eating and disruptions in weight controlling outines (if daily exercising is part of your routine).

The reduced structure of summer time more generally creates challenges. You could find yourself at home more, around food and snacks more often, and at parties. Certainly for young people, the structure at school provides a buffer between their interest in food and the availability of food – for many hours of every day. That buffer disappears in the summer. It doesn’t take much cash to undo efforts at weight control. A few dollars can buy chips and fries very easily.

Phone Coaching Can Help Promote Modest Weight Loss

Many Americans rarely leave home without their phones, and that could come in handy for those attempting to lose weight, according to a new study.

“Since so many people use cell phones and gas prices were getting higher, we thought, ‘How well can we reach people, and how well can we reach people if it’s not face to face?’” said Larry Tucker, Ph.D., the study’s lead author.

Tucker and colleagues at Brigham Young University found that of 120 men and women who received 11 sessions of personalized weight-loss phone coaching over a 17-week period lost an average of seven pounds, compared with an average of four pounds in un-coached adults. The sessions lasted 30 minutes.

The study appears in the November/December issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

“People tend to do better when they have a support system and when they have someone they report to each week. The weight loss coach can help people work through weight loss issues, barriers and problems,” Tucker said. “Compared to no coaching, phone coaching tends to show a benefit.”

Adding daily weight-loss supplements designed to decrease appetite and increase metabolism also produced weight loss, the authors found. Daily supplement users lost about 6.8 pounds, compared with only about four pounds in placebo users.

The greatest total weight and body fat loss — about 9.7 pounds overall and 5 pounds of fat — occurred in adults who received both coaching and took the daily supplement.

The authors disclosed that TriVita, Inc., the company that manufactures the weight-loss supplement, provided funding to the study through a research grant.

“Over time, a person is going to have to learn a new lifestyle, but I think this particular supplement may be of value to help a person while they’re transitioning into that new lifestyle,” Tucker said.

However, the study may leave readers with more questions than answers, said Robert Jeffery, Ph.D., director of the Obesity Prevention Center at the University of Minnesota.

“You couldn’t tell by reading the study what the coaches were talking about. They talked to participants 11 times, but it doesn’t say what they told people to do,” Jeffery said.

And although this study found that participants dropped pounds, it may not compare to traditional weight-loss programs.

“In a state-of-the-art, face-to-face weight loss intervention, you should be able to get an eight- to 10-kilogram (17.5 to 22 pounds) weight loss in that same time period,” Jeffery said.

Incisionless Surgery To Correct Weight Gain After Bypass

As the number of obesity cases continues to soar in the United States, the number of bariatric surgeries performed annually for weight loss increases steadily. But surgeons are now beginning to see another wave of patients whose success with the surgery has started to wane.

At Ohio State University Medical Center, surgeons have performed the first incisionless procedure in the United States for weight gain following gastric bypass � � ” which makes it possible to escape the high rate of complications associated with traditional revisional surgery.

The incisionless technique has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, using principles of revisional surgery to help shrink the size of the stomach. But the technique, � � �”endoluminal tissue approximation,� � � is accomplished totally with a tube passed through the mouth � � ” and no surgical incisions.

Key advantages of the new device, known as the StomaphyX, include: no incisions or scars; less pain; a lower rate of complications compared to the traditional revisional bariatric surgery; and a much quicker recovery, making it an outpatient procedure, according to Dr. Dean Mikami, a general surgeon at OSU Medical Center. Mikami helped to develop the new device and is the first surgeon in the U.S. to perform the procedure.

A flexible endoscope is passed through the mouth and advanced to the stomach, carrying a fiber-optic camera and a tubular surgical tool. Then tissue of the stomach is pulled by suction into the tubular device. Approximately 12 to 20 � � �”H-shaped staple-like� � � fasteners are placed strategically in the stomach, to create pleats in the tissue and reduce the size of the stomach� � �,, s pouch.

“The incisionless surgery helps to re-create the patient� � �,, s smaller stomach, causing early satiety and further weight loss,� � � said Mikami. � � �”This is currently the only endoscopic or nonsurgical way to reduce the size of the stomach after gastric bypass surgery.� � � The procedure also results in a smaller opening of the stomach� � �,, s pouch; a decrease in the stretch of the stomach, so that it can� � �,, t hold as much food; and a slower emptying of the stomach.

A total of 22 � � �”endoluminal revisional bariatric operations� � � have been performed at Ohio State� � �,, s Medical Center since April 2007. All patients are doing well, according to Mikami. The average weight loss has been about 10 pounds at one month; 15 pounds at two months; and 20 pounds at three months.

The first patient in the United States to receive the new procedure was referred to Ohio State and received the incisionless operation on April 12, 2007. She had gained approximately 50 pounds since her gastric bypass. Since the StomaphyX procedure was performed, she has lost 26 pounds, or 38 percent, of her excess body weight.

“It is estimated that over 1 million people in the last 15 years have undergone gastric bypass surgery. About 10 to 15 percent of that group two to 10 years out may need a revisional procedure to reduce the size of their gastric pouch for further weight loss or to treat a post-operative bariatric surgery syndrome such as dumping. You� � �,, re looking at close to 200,000 patients who may need this type of follow-up procedure in the U.S. alone,� � � said Mikami, who has helped to train all of the surgeons in the United States � � ” approximately 25 physicians so far � � ” who have learned the procedure.

“As a bariatric surgeon, I treat a growing number of clinical severe obese patients,� � � said Mikami. � � �”I know the joys of those patients who are cured of their diabetes and hypertension � � ” and no longer require medication. It� � �,, s like they receive a second life. Now, the new device has actually given them a third chance at life � � ” in a much safer way than could be offered in the past.� � �

The patient population for StomaphyX can range in age from 18 to 70. Mikami describes good candidates as those who have undergone gastric bypass for obesity, have re-gained some of the weight they had lost, are compliant with their diet, continue to exercise regularly, and do not have early satiety during meals. The StomaphyX procedure can give patients a tool to help them achieve their weight-loss goal and keep their obesity-related problems away.

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